2022 FedCASIC (Federal Computer Assisted Survey Information Collection)

The annual Federal Computer Assisted Survey Information Collection (FedCASIC) Workshops will be held April 5-6, 2022, as a VIRTUAL conference. Participants from NORC will be in attendance.

For the past twenty years the U.S. Census Bureau and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics have sponsored the annual Federal Computer Assisted Survey Information Collection (FedCASIC) Workshops. This series of annual meetings was originally called the Federal CAPI Workshops but its focus was expanded in 1997 to include all forms of computer assisted survey information collection (CASIC).

The online program for FedCASIC can be found here.

NORC Presentations


Incorporating Speech Analytics Into A Telephone Survey Quality Program
Time: Tuesday, 4/5/2022, 9:00 AM to 10:00 AM ET
NORC Authors: Jason Rajan, Jenny Kelly, Lauren Hartsough, Erin Criste, Kate Hobson

Speech analytics is the branch of data science that deals with computerized processing of recordings and subsequent transcriptions to extract information. (Mishra and Sharma, 2016). Call centers, particularly of the large inbound customer service type, have increasingly been using speech analytics programs to enhance or replace their agent monitoring systems. Beginning in 2020 NORC at the University of Chicago invested in one of these systems for the Telephone Surveys and Support Operations department to explore how its application could be applied to Survey Research, particularly in the realms of quality assurance and gaining cooperation. NORC addressed several challenges in its application, from basic questions like, what the best data to feed in is, to more complex ones such as how to get maximum value from short duration calls when these systems are designed for longer customer service interactions. We will discuss the promise of the software, and how we are incorporating it into our quality program, specifically looking at what it does and does not replace from the existing human call review processes. We'll also address its reception by interviewers and quality monitors.

Top Three Challenges Organizations Are Encountering In Technology And Survey Computing
Time: Tuesday, 4/5/2022, 9:00 AM to 10:00 AM ET
NORC Authors: David Trevarthen

Panelists will identify the top challenges facing their organizations today given the changing survey technology, data systems, and programming environments. Projects today often include innovative survey technologies, the use of specialized programming customizations, incorporate administrative and extant data sources, and the integration of different devices and technologies to support data collection. The panelists will discuss the ways that their organizations are dealing with the environmental changes that they have identified, and offer examples and lessons learned in addressing these challenges.

Collecting Detailed Covid-19 Vaccine History Among Medicare Beneficiaries
Time: Tuesday, 4/5/2022, 12:45 PM to 2:15 PM ET
NORC Authors: Liz Kantor, Emma Lederman, Sam Rosner, Elise Comperchio, Rachel Carnahan, ANdrea Mayfield, Megan Stead

The Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS) is a longitudinal survey of a nationally representative sample of the Medicare population sponsored by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) and administered by NORC at the University of Chicago. The MCBS has been at the forefront of COVID-19 vaccine data collection, closing important policy gaps by providing more timely data than administrative sources. Notably, MCBS vaccination data can be supplemented by other MCBS data on key factors like socio-demographics and chronic conditions. The MCBS began collecting COVID-19 vaccination data in early 2021 after the first vaccine received emergency use authorization. In response to rapidly changing vaccine availability and booster guidance, MCBS COVID-19 data collection was redesigned in Winter 2022 to add flexibility around policy changes and improve data quality using a vaccine roster. For each dose, the roster collects the date, manufacturer, and location received, enabling policymakers to answer questions about vaccination progress for sub-groups. We discuss key considerations in the design and implementation and preliminary findings from the field and data review.

Implications Of Using Proxy Respondents For In-Person Versus Phone Interviews
Time: Tuesday, 4/5/2022, 12:45 PM to 2:15 PM ET
NORC Authors: Kylie Carpenter, Sara Navin, Becky Reimer

The Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS) is a longitudinal survey of a nationally representative sample of the Medicare population sponsored by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) and administered by NORC at the University of Chicago. The MCBS has been at the forefront of COVID-19 vaccine data collection, closing important policy gaps by providing more timely data than administrative sources. Notably, MCBS vaccination data can be supplemented by other MCBS data on key factors like socio-demographics and chronic conditions. The MCBS began collecting COVID-19 vaccination data in early 2021 after the first vaccine received emergency use authorization. In response to rapidly changing vaccine availability and booster guidance, MCBS COVID-19 data collection was redesigned in Winter 2022 to add flexibility around policy changes and improve data quality using a vaccine roster. For each dose, the roster collects the date, manufacturer, and location received, enabling policymakers to answer questions about vaccination progress for sub-groups. We discuss key considerations in the design and implementation and preliminary findings from the field and data review.

Redesigning The Collection Of Home Health Care Data In The Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS)
Time: Tuesday, 4/5/2022, 12:45 PM to 2:15 PM ET
NORC Authors: Elise Comperchio, Emma Lederman, Mia Ibrahim, Megan Stead

Home health care for Medicare beneficiaries is of growing interest to Medicare policy. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (2016), Medicare paid $18.1 billion for home health care for beneficiaries with postacute or longterm skilled care needs. The Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS), a nationally representative survey of the Medicare population conducted by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) and administered by NORC at the University of Chicago, is well-positioned to collect robust home health data. CMS and NORC redesigned the MCBS Home Health Questionnaire (HHQ) to provide accurate home health data, informed by health care research, policy, and the ability to link survey data to administrative claims. This presentation discusses how home health differs from other care, why the MCBS is positioned to collect these data, evaluating the existing vs. preferred data collection design, and key features of new HHQ. The redesigned HHQ collects data in a way that closely aligns with home health delivery, making it possible for MCBS data to better support analyses on impact of payment and delivery system reforms and home health care use.

Redesigning The Collection Of Home Health Care Data In The Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS)
Time: Tuesday, 4/5/2022, 2:30 PM to 4:00 PM ET
NORC Authors: Ben Reist

This panel will discuss approaches and challenges related to data governance. Because surveys both collect data, and use existing datasets, data governance requirements can have broad impact on survey management and operations. This panel will provide the opportunity for the audience to gain an understanding of data governance requirements, challenges in meeting those requirements, and enablers to being compliant without negatively impacting survey goals. Some of the components of data governance are: Data architecture, Data quality, Data modeling and design, Data storage and operations, Data security, Data integration and interoperability, Data classification and GDPR compliance, and Meta-data.

Experiences With Home-Based Interviewer Mediated And Respondent Self-Collected Physical Measure And Specimen Collection (MCBS)
Time: Tuesday, 4/6/2022, 1:15 PM to 2:45 PM ET
NORC Authors: Katie O'Doherty

Health surveys are adding biomeasures, specimen collection, and genomics to self-reported data to increase utility. Several studies have considered the motivators, barriers, and willingness of individuals to participate in surveys with biomeasures and specimen collection. Participants are more willing to have less intrusive biomeasures collected such as height, weight, waist circumference, and saliva than intrusive measures such as a blood draw collected in their home. Incorporating these measures into a study may expand the data available for research, broaden the base of researchers using the data, and encourage more complex analyses. This session will include presentations on four national studies that are utilizing novel approaches to collect biomeasures. We will discuss the differences between sampling strategies, staffing for in-home examinations versus self-collection with bio-kits, impact on respondent burden, organizational logistics, equipment selection tradeoffs, cooperation rates, loss to follow-up, and timing of biomeasure and specimen collection within the overall study protocol.