Labor and Employment

Globalization, the digital revolution, and the lingering effects of the great recession have significantly changed the kinds of work Americans do, how they do that work, and what and how they get paid. Understanding these trends is a vital first step in responding to them in productive ways. NORC has been on the forefront of helping businesses, government agencies, and other stakeholders explore national and global employment trends, studying issues as diverse as how Americans age through the workforce, the re-integration of exoffenders into the labor market, the career arcs of doctoral degree holders in the STEM fields, and the effectiveness of youth vocational training in the developing world.

Representative Projects

American Competitiveness Survey. In collaboration with Principal Investigators John Walsh from Georgia Tech and Ashish Arora and Wes Cohen from Duke University and the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), NORC collected survey data from more than 6,600 U.S. businesses via computer-assisted telephone interviews (CATI). More

Evaluation of the Second Chance Act Adult Demonstration Projects. Funded by the National Institute of Justice, this project is designed to evaluate the Second Chance programs which were designed to facilitate the successful re-entry of prisoners to their communities and include strategies to reduce recidivism and subsequent criminal behavior, enhance employment and earnings, facilitate retraining, stabilize housing, and reduce substance abuse.​​​​ More

General Social Survey (GSS). Since 1972, the General Social Survey (GSS) has been monitoring societal change and studying the growing complexity of American society. The GSS is NORC’s longest running project, and one of its most influential.​​ More

National Longitudinal Survey of Youth - 1997. The National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY), sponsored and funded by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) of the U.S. Department of Labor, is the youth-focused component of the National Longitudinal Surveys (NLS) Program – a set of surveys used to gather information on the labor market experiences of American men and women.  More

National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979. The National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY), sponsored and funded by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) of the U.S. Department of Labor, is the youth-focused component of the National Longitudinal Survey (NLS) Program – a set of surveys used to gather information on the labor market experiences of American men and women. The National Longitudinal Surveys are conducted jointly by the Ohio State University Center for Human Resource Research (CHRR) and NORC at the University of Chicago. More

Reintegration of Ex-Offenders Random Assignment Evaluation. daThe Reintegration of Ex-Offenders Random Assignment Evaluation Study (RExO), funded by Department of Labor, is designed to provide a rigorous, random assignment evaluation of a demonstration program serving formerly incarcerated individuals through employment-centered programs. The evaluation will examine impacts on participants’ post-program labor market outcomes and criminal recidivism by comparing the outcomes of participants to randomly-assigned individuals who are eligible for, but do not receive, services. More

Resident Relocation Survey. NORC at the University of Chicago has been conducting the Resident Relocation Survey (RRS) to gain an understanding of the impact of the Chicago Housing Authority (CHA) Plan for Transformation, an ambitious effort to rehabilitate or replace substandard high-rise public housing developments in Chicago, on the lives of those relocated.​​​ More

Survey of Consumer Finances (SCF). Sponsored by the Federal Reserve Board, this triennial survey is the only fully representative source of information on the broad financial circumstances of U.S. households. No other survey collects data on the household finances of a probability sample of Americans.  Data from the SCF are used to inform monetary policy, tax policy, consumer protection, and a variety of other policy issues. The data also serve as a basis for longer-term research on the economic state of the American family.​ More